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themes from our new book, "going to tehran: why the united states must come to terms with the islamic republic of iran". the first of these means, and these two get at the heart of our book. the united states is today enhanced and for the past two years a power and relative decline in the middle east. the second core team as the biggest beneficiary of american ongoing decline in the middle east is the islamic republic of iran. if you're not sure you agree with these propositions, i want to ask you to compare the relative position of the united states and the islamic republic of a rant in middle east today with where they were on the eve of 9/11 over 10 years ago. on the eve of 9/11, every single government in the middle east with either pro-american government egypt and turkey in negotiation effectively to become pro-american but government. in libya are anti-iranian like saddam hussein's government in iraq. every single government in the middle east is either pro-americans in negotiations to become pro-american or anti-iranian. it pretty good position for the 90s dates in the middle
'm going to start with two provocative themes from our new book, "going to tehran: why the united states must come to terms with the islam you can republic of iran." the first of these themes, and these two really get at the heart of our book. the first of these themes is that the united states is today and has been for the past few years a power in relative decline in the middle east. and the second core theme is that the biggest beneficiary of america's ongoing decline in the middle east is the islamic republic of iran. if you're not sure you agree with these propositions, i want to ask you to compare the relative positions of the united states and the islamic republic of iran in the middle east today with where they were on the eve of 9/11, just over ten years ago. on the eve of 9/11, every single government in the middle east was either pro-american, like the governments in egypt and turkey, in negotiations effectively to become pro-american, like the governments in syria and libya, or anti-iranian like the taliban government in afghanistan and saddam hussein's government in iraq. ev
.s. states in the southeast of the country. >> syria has summoned the head of the united nations mission in israeli-occupied territory. the issue is an israeli air raid on what syrian officials say was a military research center near damascus. >> the arab league has also condemned the strike, but the actual target is still not exactly clear. some reports suggest a weapons convoy believe to be carrying russian-made anti-aircraft missiles from syria into lebanon. >> we will speak to an expert on the region later. first, this report. >> the israeli government has not issued any statement, but national papers are full of the news. u.s. officials say the raid targeted a weapons convoy headed for members of hezbollah, an ally of the syrian president. but the syrian government denied the existence of the vehicles, saying the israeli planes bombed a research center near damascus. russia says the facts are not yet clear but adds that any air strike would be completely unacceptable. >> we are analyzing the information as we receive it. if the allegations are confirmed, then it is our position this
qaeda or its continued plotting against the united states and other countries. the preeminent security threat to the ad states remains al qaeda and its adherents. since september 11, the counter- terrorism effort has been aimed at preventing the counter terror -- the counter efforts of al qaeda on the homeland. al qaeda continues to edify operatives overseas and develop new methods overseas to attack us at home. affiliated movements have taken us beyond the core leadership in afghanistan and pakistan, including the middle east, and east africa, central asia, and southeast asia. although each group is unique, all aspire to advance al qaeda's agenda by stabilizing the companies in which they operate and attacking the u.s. and plotting to strike it u.s. homeland. in south asia, al qaeda continues to pose a threat from its base of operation in pakistan's tribal areas. in order to use that to carry a attacks against a homeland as well as our interests and those of our allies and partners in pakistan, afghanistan, india, and europe. the united states faces to counter terrorism charges -- a d
, here is wolf. >>> i'm wolf blitzer in washington. we want to welcome our viewers in the united states and around the world to a special edition of "the situation room." for the next hour i'll take you behind the scenes to my extraordinary trip to egypt. to see if democracy is taking hold or being threatened. i had some very tough questions for egypt's new president. stand by for morning exclusive reporting. >>> i have covered the middle east for decades, but learned a lot during my trip to egypt, i saw firsthand how one of the united states's most important friends in the middle east is struggling after its revolution two years ago. i spent more than an hour talking exclusively with the egyptian president, mohamed morsi. he welcomed me to his presidential palace in cairo. and i toured the city's famous tahrir square, where the arab spring demonstrations changed the course of history. i stood in tahrir square days ago, the symbol of the revolution was largely deserted. it looked very different two years ago, during those intense days leading up to the overthrow of the egyptian presiden
, the eisenhower doctrine and the united states' desire to push back. libya was desperately pleading for u.s. attention back then, for aid to get itself together to be able to, you know, to stand on its own feet. this was before the discovery of oil. and the u.s. kind of took a, well, you know, you're really not as important as egypt, for example, and, you know, we'll think about it. and the result was that the prime minister at the time, you know, basically devised a plan to court the soviets and see if he could grab the united states' attention. and that happened. the next, you know, major event was the libya's and gadhafi's successful bid to change drastically the way that oil pricing was conducted by squeezing the independent oil companies -- occidental petroleum first and foremost -- into changing the system whereby there would be a 50/50 split and, basically, controlling interests by u.s. companies in libyan oil. and the consequence of that has come through to this day in terms of increasing the power of, the economic power of the gulf states, available b ya in particular. -- saudi a
. who gets privilege of becoming a citizen of the united states of america. that's a big deal. when we talk about that in the abstract, it's easy sometimes for the discussion to take on a feeling of us versus them. and when that happens, a lot of folks forget that most of us used to be them. [chuckles] >> we forget that [applause] it's really important foritous remember our history. unless you are one of the first americans, a native american, you came from someplace else. somebody brought you. [cheers and applause] you know, ken salazar, he's of mexican-american dissent, but his family's been living where he lives for 400 years. so he didn't immigrate anywhere. the irish, who left behind a land of famine, the germans who fled persecution, the scandinavians who arrived eager to pioneer out west, the polish, the russians, the italgian, the chinese, the japanese, the west indians, the huddled masses who came from ellis island on one coast and angel island on the other... [applause] all those folks, before they were us, they were them. and when each new wave of immigrants, they faced from
the united states of america! [cheers and applause] >> goodach, everyone. we just watched as president obama pushed his plan for immigration reform in las vegas. coming just one day after the senate beat him to the punch, announcing its bipartisan proposal. president obama making remarks in las vegas. the president called for granting a path to citizenship for the estimated 11 million people in the united states, currently illegally. he praised the senate's efforts in announcing an immigration proposal yesterday. that plan had a key provision, requiring tighter border security before any illegal immigrants could get citizenship. that was key to republican support. it also calls for beefing up border security and punishments for businesses that hire illegal immigrants. republicans say they will not sign off on any immigration reform that doesn't put border security first. let's go to carl cameron in washington. how do you break this down? is there a big difference from what you heard from president obama, compared to the bipartisan commission of eight senators yesterday? we heard a lot more f
that opened up hope for six and a half million people. the problem is the united states has never been very good, whether it's in afghanistan, iraq, in creating an alternative and the bol line is the united states basically walked away when it came to how do you create a new state, how do you facilitate the diverse forces, whether it's the tribal elements, more than 300 militias that had formed during that brief eight-month involvement, how do you stem the flow of weaponry and create an alternative. if you saw charlie wilson's war, at the very ending of the movie when he says i raised all this money, billions of dollars for arms to the opposition to fight off the soviets but i couldn't raise a couple of million dollars for education. it's the same kind of problem. we're not good at figuring out what alternatives are and as a result libya destabilized and a lot of the arms that went into libya, a lot of the forces that were militarized flowed not just into mali and algeria but across a huge chunk of northwest africa. as a result you see a huge destabilization that's affect in turn little tun
. [applause] >> if you get sick and choose to go to the united states, you have a higher risk of medical error. the cures for aids and alzheimer's will come from america, not canada. >> imagine a world without religious faith. not just no place to worship, no prayer, no scripture, but no men or women who, because of their faith, dedicate their lives to others. >> over us to supervise this. a celestial dictatorship. a kind of divine north korea. [laughter] >> i can't believe i'm about to say this, but dr. kissinger, you have six minutes. >> i think that is the kind of hypocritical argument i would find quite annoying. [laughter] >> you obviously finding it annoying even if you are not chinese. [laughter] >> well, ladies and gentlemen, welcome to the munk debates on iran. [cheers and applause] this is munk's debates on iran's nuclear ambitions. it is my privilege to organize this series and once again at as your moderate. we begin with a look back, a look back of some of the memorable moments of previous debates. tonight is a special evening for this series. tonight is our 10th semiannual munk d
faith and credit of the united states for whatever agenda you have. the business community felt that. the public felt that. and so the fact that they have backed off both -- not only the idea that we should hold debt ceiling hostage, but second that it shouldn't be one for one cuts, you know, boehner used to say that, the house proposal doesn't say that, dollar in cutting for every dollar in raising the debt ceiling. >> would you support a short-term measure to force you to pass a budget? >> i think it should be longer because we don't want to play fiscal cliff every three months. but it's a positive step. >> you never get a clean debt ceiling raise. >> yes, you should. >> that's not a question of whether you should. but historically it's not been the case. >> mitch mcconnell proposed it two years ago and we passed it. but let me say this on the budget. we democrats have always intended to do a budget this year. for two reasons. first, it is not true that we haven't had budget control in effect over the last several years. the budget control act of 2011 put rigid spending cuts that a
problem. >> also in the uk we have that. liz: britain is not the size of the united states. we have different issues. >> yes but we have to much austerity you do not want to go our direction. liz: you have been terrific. have a terrific weekend. thank you for watching. lou: good evening, everybody. a federal appellate court ruling that president obama violated the constitution more than a year ago when he made three recess appointments to the national labor relations board. this week began with the administration's all-out assault on the second amendment and our right to own guns and concludes with this federal court ruling that the administration acted against the constitution and in so doing the court, through the nlrb rulings of the past 16 months into question. this week the republican party put forward a plan on the debt ceiling in debt and appears to have won the support of both the president and senate majority leader. the republican change in direction and tone was not matched by a change in the republican party's lead. the rnc reelected the chairman after losing both the wh
with impunity. for the united states it hasn't been an area of vital interest ever. it's much closer to europe. it's much more of concern to europe than it has ever been for the united states. that's why we kind of led from behind. >> in libya. >> in libya itself. because europeans were the ones exercised about it. we didn't care that much in terms of vital national interests compare today say the gulf. but just as after the soviet union was thrown out of afghanistan, we considered afghanistan not of any real interest to us and of course that's where al qaeda took root. so here again we've got that problem. and we cannot afford to let this just burgeon forth because you can see in the attack in algeria that american lives are at stake here. >> this was the point secretary clinton made as part of her testimony. she says anywhere the united states is not have a significant involvement, particularly in such areas of instability and a threat from a jihadist movement and affiliate say of al qaeda, there could be real problems. we see it in algeria and yet what did we hear from the president this we
karzai. we're there for the benefit of the united states. as long as there is a threat that comes from afghanistan, al qaeda, as long as afghanistan could be in the future used as a potential safe haven against people in the united states, we're there, we have to recognize that we're there.safee united states, we're there, we have to recognize that we're there. and we have to remember first principles. we're there for the defense of the american mainland and american people. >> always good to get your thoughts. appreciate it, sir. >> take care. >>> in december russias passed a law banning u.s. adoptions. that left hundreds in limbo wondering what were happening to the children they were already in the process of adopting. now there may be some hope for those people. >>> one problem after another this week if boeing 787 dream liner. now the u.s. government weighing in. >>> also coming up, it is the first and only exhibition of its kind to ever tour the united states featuring 150 mummies. fr r. clear, huh? i'm not juice or fancy water. i've got nine grams of protein. that's three times
conflicts in the north. i'm not sure the united states has [indiscernible] >> thank you. great question. first and foremost, we recognize that it is not only the u.s., it is not our responsibility do just that, not the primary people. that must reside with the nigerian government. it we tried to take the lead, we would not get it right. we do not understand the context. we are americans and not nigerians. it would be difficult for us to be effective. our focus has been working through our u.s. ambassador with the nigerians to say, what can we do to help you? we think that is the right approach. we have an ongoing dialogue with the nigerian officials on what types of support might be helpful. for my comment about mali, there are numerous nigerian officers and noncommissioned officers who trained with us for a year in the united states and other programs across europe. we think that is a good endeavor. we are talking with the nigerians. they made some specific request to help them. some of the lessons that we have learned in iraq and afghanistan in countering improvised explosive devices,
, the government of the united states under the constitution is a limited government and the constitution is to protect the people from the government, not for the government to give people rights and powers that the government then, in turn, could take away. on the other hand, the constitution does give broad powers to the federal government but it separates them among branches and between the states and the national government. the framers believed these structures would adequately control the government so as to protect individual liberty. but the american people disagreed. they believed that the constitution gave the federal government so much power that it could be tyrannical and violate individual rights. so as a condition of ratification, they demanded and received assurances that a bill of rights would be added to the constitution. now, each of those rights, including the second amendment dealing with guns, was adopted to yet further limit government power and to protect individual rights. in other words, the people that wrote the constitution in 1787, in the spirit that they beli
destruction that justified a war, the invasion of the united states. we are still searching for those weapons. they didn't exist. thousands of americans lost their lives. we could have a hearing on that if you'd like. >> ifill: while the benghazi attack was the main focus, secretary clinton also turned her attention to upheaval elsewhere in north africa. >> benghazi did not happen in a vacuum. the arab revolutions have scrambled power dynamics and shattered security forces across the region. instability in mali has created an expanding safe haven for terrorists who look to extend their influence and plot further attacks of the kind we saw just last week in algeria. >> ifill: in mali, elements of al qaeda in the islamic maghreb, known as a.q.i.m., have seized a large swath of territory, prompting france to intervene militarily with air power and ground troops. the u.s. military is providing transport flights to aid the french, and clinton said other assistance is under consideration. >> it is a necessary struggle. we cannot permit northern mali to become a safe haven. people say to me all the
not be so in the united states military? >> no, i cannot think of any reason. and i have heard the naysayers. i no there are many out there that believe this cannot be done without compromising those standards . having served almost 38 years in an institution where i have lived and scene change throughout my career, and i can assure you, being one of the very first female officers had the opportunity to attend airborne school, and you can imagine the looks on the instructors. it was not a popular decision. but, can assure you that having that opportunity to go to airborne school. people say why you want to jump out of a perfectly good airplane? well, it was exciting. it sounded challenging. so i had the opportunity to do that, but by having that opportunity that later opened the door for me to serve in the esteemed 802nd airborne division and command there. i had the opportunity to go to jet master's cool. that is a very prestigious and demanding school. primarily male dominated. i was the only female in the class surrounded by special forces folks. you know, they didn't change the standards
ronald regan and one of the most decorated veterans of vietnam. united states senator. celebrated author. lawyer. and i thought he made a pretty strong, persuasive case. so did many of us. >> let's turn to cybersecurity. i was pleased that you mentioned cyber security in your initial remarks. they have moved expand its cyber security efforts. i have to talk about colorado. the air force academy is well positioned to train those. would you talk a little more on your take on cyber security and what sort of resources we need. >> i've been to those facilities in colorado a few times and don't know as much about them as you do, but i am familiar with them. they are essential to our national security. cyber, i believe represents as big a threat to the security of this country as any one specific threat. for all the reasons this committee understands. it's an insidious quiet, kind of a threat that we have never quite seen before. it can paralyze a nation in a second. not just a power grid or banking system. but it can knock out satellites. it can take down computers on all our carrier battle s
in reciting the pledge of allegiance to the flag. i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. the president pro tempore: the majority leader. mr. reid: would the chair announce the business for the day. the president pro tempore: under the previous order the leadership time is reserved. and under the previous order the senate will be in a period of morning business until 1:30 p.m. for debate only, with senators permitted to speak therein for up to ten minutes each. mr. durbin: mr. president? the president pro tempore: the senator from illinois. mr. durbin: after any statement by the majority leader, i'd ask consent to be recognized in morning business. the president pro tempore: without objection. mr. durbin: it is my understanding the majority leader is going to yield the floor to me at this moment. the president pro tempore: the senator from illinois. mr. durbin: mr. president, the state of nevada was admitted to the union in 1864. since 1864 there have
hands. when it comes to america's role in world affairs, i know we agree it is critical the united states remain fully engaged. we project the power of our military strength when necessary and the wisdom of our democratic ideals as we adjust to the new threats and demands we will face. there is no doubt he will be tested in your new role as secretary, nor is there any doubt that you will pass any tests with honors as you always have. let me thank you on behalf of the committee for all you have done in the senate and the chairmanship of this committee is an anticipation of your confirmation by the full senate, i wish you good luck and godspeed in many journeys that lie ahead. we look forward to having a close working relationship with you as the next secretary of state. let me recognize senator corker. >> thank you, mr. chairman. let me thank are three distinguished guests. i want to thank you for your courtesy over the last six years as i served on this committee. i looked at you and been nominated for this as someone who has lived their entire life for this moment of being able to
, congressional republicans have held the full faith and credit of the united states of america hostage for political points and debates. instead of doing what congress has always done under both parties, allowing the government to pay the bills it has accrued. they decided to play a game of chicken with the global economy. reporter: paul ryan, we are told, is working on a budget plan that would balance within 10 years. it is expected that patty murray's idea of the budget will be quite different. but the bottom line is a lot of people who say we need the budget with this debt of $16 trillion are going, will be glad to get to the table and work on an actual budget speech you we will see how it turns out. mike emanuel, thank you very much be one a fox news weather alert. extreme winter weather is gripping parts of the south. arctic air and freezing rain expected from arkansas to the north carolina and south carolina area. dangerous driving conditions. up to a quarter inch of ice can accumulate. people in the upper midwest and northeast are wondering when the cold will end. another day of
of destruction in the united nations world heritage site, looting tombs and burning into documents. residents have welcomed the soldiers with open arms. >> just days ago, the islamists still controlled timbuktu. now their flag has come down. soldiers and civilians are celebrating. >> i dreamt of this day. mali is being reborn. >> most residents of the ancient trading town were relieved when paratroopers arrived. timbuktu has been in the hands of islamists for 10 months. >> for 10 months, the islamists enforced a strict form of sharia law. this man says his hand was chopped up because he was accused of stealing a mattress. this woman says she was with and jailed for a minor offense. >> my head job -- hijab slipped off my face. that's why they put me in jail and beat me. >> residents have been raising the traces of the islamists. some have been taking revenge, plundering stores belonging to merchants suspected of collaborating. in ethiopia, a donor's conference has raised pledges of hundreds of millions of aid. its president expressed his gratitude. >> thank you on behalf of mali and the malia
weakened. 3m up 13%, united technologies up 12%. they are naturals to repeat their gains if not do better given strong asian exposure. 3m has been held back by a weak china. they can only improve from here after the tax bill. two well-run companies, perfect proxies for worldwide growth. 11% gains, even the most boring of stocks can generate returns. i think the same gain is in the cards for this year. cisco for all its flaws, still beat the dow by a percentage point. i can't see this company returning to the days of yore, that's not going to happen. but up 8 pr%, it can do that ag. i think it can return to the mid 20s where it closed today. what's with burke falling so far behind and an inferior pfizer going up at least historically. the pipeline needs improvement here or we'll see high single digits again. they will remain the order of the day if not the year until we hear about something that can produce multiple billions of dollars in the out years and i certainly don't see anything in merck's pipeline that can do that. verizon didn't help the cause. it's been such a good one. i think
united states, must shell out hundreds of billions of dollars to combat climate change, but should they tell us to spend more? here's what you posted on facebook. addy says they shouldn't tell us anything, and william writes, no, we are not the world's polluters nor the world's bankers. i like both of those comments. we also asked on our website, 1% said yes, and 99% said no. we don't need no people telling us what to do. finally, tonight, more overreaction in the wake of the tragedy at newtown, connecticut last month. yesterday, we told you about a five year old girl suspended from school talking about her hello kitty bubble gun. remember that? today, groupon, canceled all firearm offers. you can't buy a gun through groupon, but could get deals on shooting ranges and clay shooting events. officials are not saying how long the shutdown lasts, and i thought it was leg waxing and facials, but that's another example of the knee jerk reactions to the tragedy. make responsible decisions when it comes to dealing with gun violence. that's my two cents more. that's all for tonight's "willi
calls for creating a path to citizenship for those who are already living here in the united states illegally and they also want to reform the legal immigration system that the u.s. has in place and they want to create an effective employment verification system to prevent the hiring of unauthorized workers which will help combat identity theft and establishing an improved process for future workers it to serve our work force needs. tomorrow, president obama is expect today layout his vision for sweeping immigration reforms and billed as a major speech, however, ahead of that and in response to what we heard today out of the senate i thought i would share my views, as a conservative on this topic. now, the issue of immigration has been used as a political wedge by democrats for years. and now, republicans, they have been falsely accused of not caring about latino immigrants because the republicans demand that our borders be secured and secured first. now, let's cut to the chase, if we don't secure american borders, we'll never be safe as a country. this has got to be a top national
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 419 (some duplicates have been removed)

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